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A first pass at an org chart for the US Federal government

When I started trying to understand how the US Government works, I've been trying to find a chart that would list all the different department, agencies, and other organizational entities that comprise the government — and show how they are related to each other. I can't believe that I'd be the only person to find such an org chart useful; indeed, this idea is echoed in a project idea listed on the Sunlight Labs wiki as OPML the Federal Government:

Project Idea: This is a quick win– just create an OPML file of the existing structure of the Federal Government agencies in all branches.

As a step to creating such a representation, I've scraped the data in

Appendix C of OMB Circular No. A-11 (Sept 2008).http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/a11/current_year/app_c.pdf.

Under the MAX system, OMB assigns agency and bureau codes that are used to identify and access data in the budget database. The following table lists these codes in budget order. It also provides the corresponding agency codes assigned by Treasury. In certain instances, a different Treasury agency code may be used for some accounts in an agency; a complete listing can be found in the Budget Accounts Title (BAT) file.

I've uploaded this PDF to scribd to make it easier for readers to see the data the pdf has:

Source
OMB Circular a 11 Appendix c

I read this PDF into Adobe Acrobat 8, saved it as "XML 1.0", messaged the XML a bit by hand to make it easier to apply some XQuery to create a starter OPML 1.0 file, and then did some more manual editing to represent the data in the correct hierarchy to produce:

http://labs.dataunbound.com/doc/2009/06/OMB_A_11_C.xml

My working assumption is that OMB Agency/Bureau codes + Treasury Agency Codes provide the key to unlocking a significant part of the higher levels of the US Federal Government. More on this assumption later.

You can see this OPML rendered by optimalbrowser.com as such:

Some Possible Next Steps:

{ 2 } Comments

  1. Jonathan Rochkind | June 18, 2009 at 3:35 pm | Permalink

    Nice. Interesting that the chart rarely goes to three levels of hieararchy, and never goes to four. I expected a deeper hieararchy. Hmm, wonder what that means.

  2. Raymond Yee | June 18, 2009 at 8:06 pm | Permalink

    Thanks, Jonathan. I don't know whether it's just that OMB codes don't reach below the bureau level or whether the chart is just missing the next levels. I'll try to find out.

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  1. We OPML’d the DoD | Kevin Curry | October 12, 2010 at 11:02 am | Permalink

    […] Labs for feedback on choosing the right technology to get the job done. Raymond Yee provided an excellent model for us to follow (in response to this project idea from Clay Johnson). This entry was posted in […]

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